Over the Top Blueberry Muffins

Over the Top Blueberry Muffins


I try to make a habit of going back from time-to-time to retry my recipes from the past, and recently I decided to pit my two blueberry muffin recipes against each other. The recipe from my second book, I’m Just Here For The Food, was designed to be kind of course and forgive the badly overexposed adjective rustic, and the one from Good Eats was formulated to be softer and more cupcake like. And I decided I didn’t like either of them. But a hybrid is just right. Oh, and I upped the portion, not because we need bigger muffins, but because everybody likes a muffin top.

Top Heavy Blueberry Muffins
Yields 13
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Ingredients
  1. 22 ounces all-purpose flour
  2. 4 teaspoons baking powder
  3. 2 teaspoons baking soda
  4. 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  5. 8 ounces sugar
  6. 1 cup vegetable oil
  7. 2 large eggs
  8. 2 large egg yolks
  9. 16 ounces plain whole fat yogurt
  10. 1 tablespoon orange zest
  11. 12 ounces fresh blueberries
  12. 2 tablespoons demerera sugar
Instructions
  1. Heat the oven to 375 degrees F and coat a standard 12-cup muffin pan (and one small oven safe ramekin) with non-stick spray.
  2. Whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in a large mixing bowl. In second bowl whisk together the sugar, oil, eggs, yolks, yogurt and orange zest until smooth.
  3. Make a crater in the middle of the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients into it. Stir with a rubber spatula until just barely combined. Resist the urge to over-mix – there should be a some lumps of flour in the batter
  4. Fold in the blueberries, mixing just to combine.
  5. Drop about a cup of batter in each of the muffin tin's wells. Whatever's left over can be dropped into the prepared ramekin. The cups should be quite full.
  6. Sprinkle the muffins with the demerera sugar and bake for 25 to 30 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the bottom of a muffin comes out clean.
  7. Remove from oven and turn out, upside down, onto a clean tea towel to cool completely. This step is key in preventing mushy muffin bottoms, which nobody and I do mean nobody likes.
  8. Serve immediately or store in an airtight container for up to a week (or until they taste gross, smell bad, or grow fur).
Notes
  1. The main reason for placing so much batter in each hole is to produce enough rise and spread for a proper muffin top.
ALTON BROWN https://altonbrown.com/
Alton Brown's Blueberry Muffins Recipe

Alton Brown’s Blueberry Muffins Recipe

90 Comments

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  1. 1
    Jenn Duckworth

    I made them here this morning with a few twists…lemon zest instead of orange, and vanilla yogurt. They came out beautiful and delicious!!

  2. 2
    Donna G

    I used vanilla greek yogurt and was surprised at how thick and spongy the batter turned out. I only had mini muffin tins – this recipe made 48 minis and I still had leftover batter. Since it was so thick, I used a biscuit cutter to shape 6 additional “muffins” on a parchment lined-quarter sheet (which turned out like muffin tops). This recipe was a big hit – not too sweet, the perfect crumb and moisture. Thanks, Alton! Tossing out my other blueberry muffin recipes.

  3. 4
    Connie

    I like “just the tops” and want to make muffin tops. I have the pan but no idea on how much to put in them or how long to cook them. Can you help and will this recipe work for just tops?

  4. 6
    Evangeline

    Hello, Can you please tell me how much flour to use in cups rather than ounces? I do not have a scale for measuring that way. Looking at a conversion chart, it appears to be 4.99 cups of flour, but that seem like an awful lot of flour for 12 muffins. Thanks.

    • 7
      Garrison

      Use about 4 and 1/4 cups of AP flour. But PLEASE just buy a kitchen scale! They’re less than 25 bucks. Bite the bullet and after you’ll have eternal happiness.

  5. 8
    Stacey

    I just made these and they turned out great. I opted to use sour cream vs yogurt and my batter was very thick as well. I’m very happy with how they came out.

  6. 9
    SamSam

    Salt surprises. When salt is put in the dry especially when it isn’t mixed well with the wet it is too easily tasted. Also when its Kosher salt it’s more noticeable like the giant crystals on pretzels. I often mix the salt with the wet so it dissolves out more and I’m not left with explosions of saltiness when enjoying the food but I do have really sensitive tastes buds.

  7. 10
    Lauren

    I wish I’d read the comments before I baked! I used full-fat Greek yogurt (picked it up by mistake) and the batter was indeed like that for scones. Agree with adding a couple of ounces of sugar, but one of my willing taste-testers liked them as-is. I, too, thought the zest was too strong; will leave it out next time, as I’m not a fan anyway. May try almond extract at some point. BUT: texture was exactly what I was looking for. Most recipes give you blueberry cake, not muffins. The coarse crumb was wonderful. I didn’t bother with the overfill, as I wanted more manageable muffins, but next time I’d bake at 350. At 375, the muffins were a bit too brown after 25 minutes – they have delightfully crunchy exteriors but I’m concerned they’ll dry out too fast. The yield I got was 12 standard and 20 minis (and that particular set of mini tins is large-ish). Popped most of them in the freezer and we’re good to go. I was thrilled to find a recipe that turns out so many muffins, because if I’m going to mess up the kitchen, I want plenty to show for it.

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